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Legalities




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Italy Wedding Legalities:

Minimum Residency

There is no residency requirement for British citizens wishing to marry in Italy (as long as you are there in enough time for paperwork checks and any pre-wedding meetings).

 

Applying for a marriage licence

To issue a marriage licence the Italian authorities - in this case the Comune (Town Hall) - normally require a 'Nulla Osta' form.

A Nulla Osta is the Italian version of a 'Certificate of No Impediment' or CNI, which is simply a document required by some foreign authorities to allow a non-national to marry in their country.

 

Applications for a CNI are done through your local Registrar in the UK and it usually takes up to one month to process. See our 'Paperwork Explained' section for details and to find your local office.

Once you have your CNI it will then be sent to Italy for the authorities there to produce your Nulla Osta - see below.

Need to know:

* You will need to have decided on your wedding venue in Italy before applying for a CNI in the UK. If you change your venue, a new notice usually has to be given.

* Once you have received your CNI your wedding must take place within 1 year.

* Allow plenty of time for the application to process through the UK and Italian authorities.

The application process:

 

1) Apply for your CNI as above

2) Once you’ve received the CNI from the UK Registrar, you will need to send this – along with the documents listed below - to the British Consular office in the Italian district you’re marrying in (you'll find details in the Contacts section).

Usually you will need the following documents:

* Birth Certificate (with parents names)

* Couple Information Form (a very basic form with details of all names, including parents and passport details). You can download one from the British Embassy website - click here to see a copy.

* Passport (just photocopy of the data page if applying by post)

Additional documents where relevant:

* Death Certificate or Divorce Absolute together with previous marriage certificate

* Deed Poll if name has been changed

Essential

It is important that you check with the UK Consulate office relevant to your wedding location first to find out what additional documents they need, what form of payment they would like, how long the processing may take and any other additional steps you need to take. Click here to find the office nearest to your wedding venue.

Make a note of everything you send, when you sent it, and take copies!

3) The British Consular office will then issue the Nulla Osta which is required by the Italian local authorities. This usually takes a few days – up to a week.

* NB The Italian Authorities normally require additional notice to include 2 Sundays after the production of the consular nulla osta or CNI. They may however be prepared to shorten this if neither bride nor groom is an Italian citizen.

Your Marriage Certificate:

1) The British couple must provide the British Consular Officer in the district where the marriage has taken place with a certified copy of the marriage certificate issued by the Comune (Town Hall), together with (if necessary) a translation into English.

You may request a multilingual certificate issued according to the Convention of Paris 1956 (which does not require translation) but you should be aware that this document is not available at all Town Halls.

2) The British Consular Officer then forwards the certificate to the General Registry Office in the UK (a fee is payable). This certificate will not be returned to you. Please enclose your full home address in the UK.

In Italy payment should be made by means of an 'Assegno Circolare' (certified cheque) made out to the appropriate British Consulate i.e. ‘Ambasciata Britannica Roma’ (British Consulate Rome), ‘Consolato Britannico Napoli’, etc. Contact the relevant Consulate Office regarding method of payment - click here to find their details in our contacts section.